May 31: A presidential liability

"President unapologetic for responsibility to the hundreds who died unnecessarily due to his disastrous involvement in the Oslo Accords."

By JERUSALEM POST READERS
May 30, 2013 23:36
3 minute read.
Letters

Letters 370. (photo credit: REUTERS/Handout )

A presidential liability

Sir, – I agree with Michael Freund (“Shimon’s Balderdash,” Fundamentally Freund, Comment and Features, May 28).

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Here we have a president – an unelected political appointment in his twilight years – unapologetic for his responsibility to the hundreds of our people who died unnecessarily due to his disastrous involvement in the Oslo Accords.

He acted in concert with pathetic characters, together with Arab thugs, murderers and gangsters. I am irate that he still acts like he wants to be prime minister and influence our citizens.

He has had his chance as a failed, deposed and recycled political leader. He should not be allowed a platform to act as a spokesman for our government or our way of life.

JACK DAVIS Jerusalem.

Sir, – Bravo to Michael Freund for saying what has long needed to be said. Our president has long since outstayed his usefulness and has become a liability.



Notwithstanding his popularity abroad (he says what they want to hear), he is an obstacle to achieving an accommodation with the Arab world. Not content with engineering the Oslo disaster, he wants us to continue in the same tragic path. This man, who has said that we can learn nothing from history, seems to have extended this gem of wisdom to learning nothing from the present. His rosetinted future cannot be reached from here, and certainly not by ignoring today’s realities.

I do, however, disagree with Freund’s analogy to flying lessons offered by the captain of the Hindenberg.

At least Max Pruss was not the designer of the ill-fated Zeppelin.

MERVYN DOOBOV Jerusalem

Sir, – Strategic Affairs Minister Yuval Steinitz is totally correct about the president getting involved in areas beyond his remit (“Steinitz: Peres doesn’t speak for government,” May 27).

The president holds a titular role – somewhat like the royals worldwide, who do not make their political views known but respect those of the democratically elected government. The president acts outside the law and it is time he was brought to book by this government: Either he stops this interference or he resigns.

We cannot go on with the situation – we are becoming the laughing stock of the world.

SIDNEY LEVINE London

Sir, – Yuval Steinitz’s latest comments on President Shimon Peres’s speech at the World Economic Forum were certainly uncalled for by the so-called strategic affairs minister, whose only strategy will be to make certain no negotiations take place. Should they take place, despite every effort to make them fail, any serious discussions will have to consider maybe some evacuation of settlements, anathema in any circumstance to both Steinitz and Tourism Minister Uzi Landau.

They are playing a dangerous game and acting irresponsibly. Rather than always stating what he won’t do, Steinitz should try to present some original strategic thinking, which is his job. He is the wrong man in the wrong place, and a very poor choice as a minister.

HENRY WEIL Jerusalem

Sir, – Why are so many people surprised by President Shimon Peres dabbling in politics when he should be representing the entire nation? It would do us well to remember the words of our martyred leader Yitzhak Rabin. He warned us to keep Jerusalem as our united capital, to insist that a Palestinian state (if one were to arise in Judea and Samaria) remain demilitarized, and to maintain an Israeli military presence in the Jordan Valley.

He also warned us that Shimon Peres is an “incessant underminer” (hatran bilti-nil’eh). These are Rabin’s principles, that should come to mind when we do honor to his memory every November.

DOUG GREENER Jerusalem

CORRECTION: The last line in Thursday’s editorial (“Nasrallah’s harangue,” May 30) should have read, “This is a heartening development for Israel and a welcome byproduct from its policy of non-intervention.”


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