Joe Biden: You ain't black if you can't choose between me and Trump

Biden said on the the US broadcaster Fox News to an African-American co-host that ‘If you have a problem figuring out whether you’re for me or Trump, then you ain't black.'

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks on the second night of the second U.S. 2020 presidential Democratic candidates debate in Detroit, Michigan (photo credit: REUTERS)
Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks on the second night of the second U.S. 2020 presidential Democratic candidates debate in Detroit, Michigan
(photo credit: REUTERS)
Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden was criticized for allegedly racist comments he made in a Friday morning interview with Charlamagne tha God on the New York City-based radio program "The Breakfast Club."
"If you have a problem figuring out whether you’re for me or Trump, then you ain’t black," Biden said.
Biden later apologized. “I shouldn’t have been such a wise guy," Biden said on a subsequent call with the US Black Chambers Inc, an African-American business group. “I shouldn’t have been so cavalier.”
The remarks came when Charlamagne criticized Biden's congressional voting record on issues of race and the ongoing debate within the Biden camp on a potential female African-American vice president running-mate. 
“I’m not acknowledging anybody who is being considered, but I guarantee you, there are multiple black women being considered. Multiple,” Biden said about his search for a potential vice presidential nominee.
Questions over Biden's voting record on racial topics as a US senator from Delaware stems from the latter's support for a 1994 crime bill, which according to Charlamagne, “was damaging to the black community.” The 1994 bill in question has been accused of disproportionately targeting visible minority communities and people of color.
“What happened was, it wasn’t the crime bill. It was the drug legislation. It was the institution of mandatory minimums,” Biden said, referring to former first lady and 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hilary Clinton's decision to apologize for her support for the bill. 
Biden also aimed to refute claims that the Democratic Party takes its historical support from African-Americans for granted, saying that he has received strong support, adding that “they’re the folks [who], as they say it my way, ‘brung me to the dance.’ That’s how I get elected every single time,” he said, imploring Charlemagne: “Come on man, give me a little break here. This is where I come from.”
 
Upon Biden being forced to finish the interview, Charlemagne claimed that Biden was not giving adequate attention to White-American and African-American media equally.
“I do that to white media and black media because my wife has to go on at 6 o’clock,” Biden responded, referencing a later interview by Jill Biden.
“Listen, you’ve got to come see us when you come to New York, VP Biden. It’s a long way until November. We’ve got more questions,” Charlemagne said. 
“You’ve got more questions?” Biden responded. “Well, I tell you what, if you have a problem figuring out whether you’re for me or Trump, then you ain’t black.”
 
In response, Charlemagne said that “it don’t have nothing to do with Trump, it has to do with the fact [that] I want something for my community."
Biden retorted, saying “take a look at my record, man! I extended the Voting Rights [Act] 25 years. I have a record that is second-to-none,” he said. “The NAACP’s endorsed me every time I’ve run. I mean, come on. Take a look at the record.”
 
The clip of the interview quickly went viral sparking Twitter trends such as, #JoeBidenIsARacist and #YouAintBlack. Many used the hashtags to discuss their shock at the former vice president's comment.
The Breakfast Club also tweeted a poll asking users if they agree, giving them the answer options of "wait what...no" and "absolutely."

Symone D. Sanders, a senior Biden adviser, later defended the former vice president and said, "the comments made at the end of the Breakfast Club interview were in jest."
"Vice President Biden spent his career fighting alongside and for the African American community. He won his party's nomination by earning every vote and meeting people where they are and that's exactly what he intends to do this November," Sanders tweeted.