Boeing turns to Israeli start-up for platform to 3D print aircraft and space station parts

Assembrix will lend its 3D printing virtualization platform to the aerospace giant.

 An Aeroflot Boeing 777-300ER aircraft is reflected in a puddle at Sheremetyevo International Airport outside Moscow, Russia, July 7, 2015. (photo credit: REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov/File Photo)
An Aeroflot Boeing 777-300ER aircraft is reflected in a puddle at Sheremetyevo International Airport outside Moscow, Russia, July 7, 2015.
(photo credit: REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov/File Photo)

Israeli 3D-printing software company Assembrix Ltd. has signed an agreement with Boeing, the monolithic aerospace company, committing to the development of a platform that will enable 3D-printed production of parts.

The agreement was signed as part of an existing industrial cooperation agreement between Boeing and the Economy Ministry’s Industrial Cooperation Authority, which helped to connect the companies. This latest move is a continuation of a previous agreement that was signed several years ago with Assembrix, which allows Boeing to manage and protect its intellectual property that is exposed to suppliers in the various stages of production.

3D Printing

Assembrix has developed a cloud-based platform that completely virtualizes the process of 3D printing. The company’s Virtual Manufacturing Space platform enables a simpler, more efficient and secure production process by remotely controlling each step of the printing process, from designing to printing.

“We are excited to expand and deepen our partnership with a major player like Boeing and consider it very important to continue this collaboration for the benefit of various industries that adopt the technology,” Assembrix CEO Lior Polak said. “The entrepreneurial spirit and approach to innovation on the part of the two companies creates a tremendous contribution in advancing 3D [printing] around the world.”

 Boeing 737 MAX 10 model ILA 2018. (credit: WIKIPEDIA) Boeing 737 MAX 10 model ILA 2018. (credit: WIKIPEDIA)

“The entrepreneurial spirit and approach to innovation on the part of the two companies creates a tremendous contribution in advancing 3D [printing] around the world."

Assembrix CEO Lior Polak

According to Avi Barber, vice president of Boeing Mds (missile defense systems) in Israel, Boeing’s agreement with Assembrix is indicative of the company’s growing interest in collaborating with small- and medium-sized businesses “and not just large companies as it was in the past.”

Boeing is expanding its use of 3D printing, using the technology in the creation of more than 70,000 parts in civilian and military aircraft, missile launchers, space stations and more, he said.