Ariel University team wins 3rd place in hackathon

Given just 24 hours, they were tasked to develop security applications using the NVIDIA tech platforms.

 Two members of the Ariel University hackathon team. (photo credit: COURTESY ARIEL UNIVERSITY)
Two members of the Ariel University hackathon team.
(photo credit: COURTESY ARIEL UNIVERSITY)

Last week, ten teams of tech developers, seven from Israel and the rest from Great Britain and India, gathered to compete in the NVIDIA cyber hackathon.

Given just 24 hours, they were tasked to develop security applications using the NVIDIA tech platforms: NVIDIA Morpheus, NVIDIA DOCA and the BlueField DPU chip. Some of the products of their labor would be introduced into future NVIDIA products.

During the hackathon, the participants received tools, training and examples of the use of various technologies, and received professional guidance and mentoring.

Members of the team and their mentors

The Israeli team from Ariel University computer science department included: Yanir Cohen, Yonatan Amosi, Amit Gofer and Alhi Agassi. The team created a training model that flags suspected malicious data even when it is encrypted. The most innovative aspect of the product they developed is the selective use of network traffic characteristics.

 The group from Ariel University and the NVIDIA staff. (credit: COURTESY ARIEL UNIVERSITY) The group from Ariel University and the NVIDIA staff. (credit: COURTESY ARIEL UNIVERSITY)

Before the competition, the teams were trained on the development of the  NVIDIA platform by Dr. Ron Rubin, a lecturer and researcher in the Department of Computer Science at Ariel University.

"I am very proud of the students who came in third place," said Dr. Ran Rubin, from the computer science department at Ariel University. "In fact, this is the first time the students built complex models to detect attacks - and they managed to achieve impressive results against strong and experienced teams even before they finished the course. Congratulations."

First place was won by the "Yahlom" team from the IDF Teleprocessing Corps. Second place was won by a team from Tel Aviv-based Octopus Computer Solutions. The young entrepreneur award was also given to high school students who worked on a creative program to identify malicious login attacks.