Israeli Innovation Authority to launch plans for quantum computing tech

The goal of the group is to demonstrate how quanta can advance Israel’s science and hi-tech industries, with the hope of private R&D initiatives in the future.

 Conceptual illustration of quantum dots in action. (photo credit: Lars Lüder)
Conceptual illustration of quantum dots in action.
(photo credit: Lars Lüder)

The Israeli Innovation Authority announced on Sunday the formation of a consortium to develop quantum computing technologies in the country. The group, the largest of its kind in history, was given a budget of NIS 115 million.

The consortium comprises five leading Israeli tech companies and five academic groups. They are: Israel Aerospace Industries’ ELTA Systems, Quantum Art, Classic, Qedma Quantum Computing, Rafael Advanced Defense Systems, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot; Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan; the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa; and Soroka Medical Center, Beersheba.

The focus of the consortium will be on two quantum computing processor technologies – trapped ions and superconductors. Together they are among the most advanced technology in the world of quanta. According to the Innovation Authority, “The key developments that will be prioritized include quantum processors, system-building blocks, coherent control tools, noise characterization and reduction software, and a fully automated software environment from the application level to physical implementation.”

“The key developments that will be prioritized include quantum processors, system-building blocks, coherent control tools, noise characterization and reduction software, and a fully automated software environment from the application level to physical implementation.”

Israeli Innovation Authority

The goal of the group is to demonstrate how quanta can advance Israel’s science and hi-tech industries, with the hope of private R&D initiatives in the future.

A handout picture from October 2019 shows a component of Google's Quantum Computer in the Santa Barbara lab, California, US. (credit: GOOGLE/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS)A handout picture from October 2019 shows a component of Google's Quantum Computer in the Santa Barbara lab, California, US. (credit: GOOGLE/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS)

Quantum computers are of the utmost importance to Israel

Chairman of the Innovation Authority Dr. Ami Appelbaum said that “Quantum computers are of the utmost importance to the State of Israel’s resilience and the ability of the Israeli economy to continue its’ growth.

“As quantum computing develops, it will impact many areas of everyday life, such as personalized medicine and more.

“The consortium that was approved by the Innovation Authority includes processors developed in Israel that use breakthrough scientific and technical knowledge and technologies.”

CEO of the Innovation Authority Dror Bin added that “This is potentially the most disruptive technology today, its impact is expected to be felt in many sectors such as medicine and pharma, materials development, energy, transportation and logistics, security and more. It is our duty as a government to invest in this field to prepare the national infrastructure that will allow Israeli tech to continue being global leaders.”

“This is potentially the most disruptive technology today, its impact is expected to be felt in many sectors such as medicine and pharma, materials development, energy, transportation and logistics, security and more. It is our duty as a government to invest in this field to prepare the national infrastructure that will allow Israeli tech to continue being global leaders.”

Dror Bin

As an industry, quantum computing has long promised to change the way we interact with the digital world. Based on a system of “qubits,” quantum-based systems have the ability to outperform more traditional computer systems by an order of magnitudes.

A risk in this, particularly for Israel, lies in the ability of quantum-based systems to easily crack code and break into sensitive environments – a dream for Israel’s enemies.

Therefore, being at the forefront of the future of computing is both a commercial opportunity and a security necessity.