1 in 4 Americans say pandemic strengthened their faith. For Jews, it’s 7%

The survey, published Thursday by the Pew Research Center, found that Jews had the lowest percentage of respondents whose faith has been strengthened by the crisis.

An Orthodox Jewish man wears a mask while talking on a cellphone in the Orthodox Jewish community of the Borough Park neighborhood during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID19) in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., April 30, 2020. (photo credit: REUTERS/CAITLIN OCHS)
An Orthodox Jewish man wears a mask while talking on a cellphone in the Orthodox Jewish community of the Borough Park neighborhood during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID19) in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., April 30, 2020.
(photo credit: REUTERS/CAITLIN OCHS)
A new survey found that only 7% of American Jews feel that the coronavirus crisis has strengthened their faith, as opposed to nearly a quarter of Americans as a whole.
The survey, published Thursday by the Pew Research Center, found that Jews had the lowest percentage of respondents whose faith has been strengthened by the crisis. Along with the 7% of Jews whose faith has grown stronger, 69% say their faith hasn’t changed much and 22% say they weren’t religious to begin with. A very small percentage, not represented numerically in the study, say their faith has gotten weaker.
In the United States as a whole, 24% of people say their faith has gotten stronger, 2% say it’s gotten weaker, 47% say it hasn’t changed much and 26% say they aren’t religious. The group with the largest number of respondents say their faith has gotten stronger is black Protestants, 56% of whom reported strengthening faith.
It’s possible that few Jews responded positively to the “faith” question because the question’s wording referenced “religious faith,” a terminology that tends to be less common among Jews than among Christians.