Republican David Perdue compares Trump Twitter ban to 'Germany in 1933'

Perdue claimed Twitter's decision to ban the former president was part of a "conspiracy" between Democrats and the US news media.

Former Republican US Senator David Perdue, who is primarying incumbent Brian Kemp for Georgia governor, speaks at a campaign event in Covington, Georgia, US, February 2, 2022. (photo credit: REUTERS/ELIJAH NOUVELAGE)
Former Republican US Senator David Perdue, who is primarying incumbent Brian Kemp for Georgia governor, speaks at a campaign event in Covington, Georgia, US, February 2, 2022.
(photo credit: REUTERS/ELIJAH NOUVELAGE)

Former Republican senator David Perdue, who is running for governor of Georgia, compared former president Donald Trump's Twitter ban to Nazi Germany in an interview on Friday.

On entrepreneur and pro-Trump activist Mike Lindell's show Lindell TV, Perdue commented in an interview with activists Diamond and Silk about Twitter's decision to ban Trump from the social media platform following the January 6, 2021, riot at the US Capitol by his supporters.

"Look at President Trump - if the next president can lose the right to be on Twitter, I mean, where are we, where are the rest of us? This is way out of bounds," Perdue said.

The gubernatorial hopeful claimed the decision was part of a "conspiracy" between Democrats and the US news media, saying "The Democrats in charge... [are] quite happy because it fits into their rhetoric and it also fits into their - I'm going to use the word - their conspiracy with the national media."

Perdue decried Twitter's decision as an attack on free speech, comparing it to Germany under Adolf Hitler, Russia after the Bolshevik Revolution, Cuba under Fidel Castro's communist regime, and Venezuela under President Nicolás Maduro.

Then-Senator David Perdue (R-GA) speaks during a campaign event as he runs for re-election at the Olde Blind Dog Irish Pub, in Milton, Georgia, US, December 21, 2020. (credit: REUTERS/AL DRAGO/FILE PHOTO)Then-Senator David Perdue (R-GA) speaks during a campaign event as he runs for re-election at the Olde Blind Dog Irish Pub, in Milton, Georgia, US, December 21, 2020. (credit: REUTERS/AL DRAGO/FILE PHOTO)

"When individual citizens lose the right of free voice, then we turn into a Germany in 1933, a Russia in 1919, Cuba in 1959 and Venezuela today, he said. "I don't want to go there. And free speech is one of the first things that a central one-party system takes away from us, guys. And that's what I believe the Democrats are in it for if they blow up this filibuster rule."

The Republican former senator was referring to the failure of Democrats to implement a "talking filibuster" only for voting rights legislation, which is a top priority for them, and require a simple 51-vote majority, rather than the usual 60, after senators used their opportunities to speak to filibuster the bill, according to CBS News.