Germany recognizes Bucharest as 'open ghetto' during Holocaust

Over 3,000 Holocaust survivors from Bucharest are set to receive some NIS 150,000-200,000 compensation each, totaling up to NIS 450-600 million.

  ROMANIAN SOLDIERS lay wreaths at a Holocaust memorial in Bucharest in 2014.  (photo credit: REUTERS/BOGDAN CRISTEL)
ROMANIAN SOLDIERS lay wreaths at a Holocaust memorial in Bucharest in 2014.
(photo credit: REUTERS/BOGDAN CRISTEL)

The German government on Saturday recognized the Romanian capital of Bucharest as an "open ghetto," the Israeli Social Equality Ministry announced.

Germany's recognition means over 3,000 Holocaust survivors from Bucharest are set to receive some NIS 150,000-200,000 compensation each, totaling up to NIS 450-600 million.

In addition, some 2,000 widows and widowers of Romanian-born Holocaust survivors are likely to also be eligible for compensation from the German government, the Bundesregierung.

A delegation of Social Equality and Foreign Ministries officials, headed by Social Equality and Pensions Minister Meirav Cohen, led the negotiations with Germany's Finance Ministry over the recognition of Bucharest as an "open ghetto."

Meirav Cohen (credit: FLASH90)Meirav Cohen (credit: FLASH90)

Foreign Minister Yair Lapid congratulated Social Equality and Pensions Minister Meirav Cohen for the achievement, also thanking the German government for its "commitment to Holocaust survivors."

"It is our moral duty to stand by Holocaust survivors and their families and care for their quality of life," Lapid added.