Hitler's Jewish centenarian neighbor sheds new light on Führer's life

She noted that while she and her family rarely ever came into contact with the German Führer, there was an air of fear surrounding his presence on the block.

Adolf Hitler (R) with Commander-in-Chief of the German Army Walther von Brauchitsch, Warsaw, October 1939 (photo credit: WIKIMEDIA COMMONS/RUFFNECK88)
Adolf Hitler (R) with Commander-in-Chief of the German Army Walther von Brauchitsch, Warsaw, October 1939
(photo credit: WIKIMEDIA COMMONS/RUFFNECK88)
A Jewish woman who claimed last year that she lived in the same apartment block as Adolf Hitler while growing up in Munich shared a new anecdote on the Nazi leader's life, according to a Fox News report.
Alice Frank Stock, 102, noted that while she and her family rarely ever came into contact with the German Führer, there was an air of fear surrounding his presence on the block.
“We had a wonderful cook who was elderly and very Catholic – and very anti-Hitler,” Stock explained, according to Fox News.
“Once she went out and saw a photo of Hitler hanging on the wall, and she said, ‘Yes he should be hanged, the scoundrel – but not like this!’”
“You’ll get us all into a concentration camp,” she remembers saying to the cook.
Stock said that, knowing all the details of the Holocaust and the countless German war crimes she is aware of today, she wouldn't know what to say to Hitler if given the chance all those years ago.
“I wouldn’t want to talk to him because my feelings would be too strong – I couldn’t," she said, according to the report.
"We lived in a house – a big house – and there were two entrances," Stock, who now lives in Bristol, told SWNS. "One was our apartment, number 14 – the other was either number 13 or 15. That’s where Hitler lived."
Hitler's half-niece Geli Raubal is believed to have lived in the block. She committed suicide at age 23, reportedly by shooting herself in the head with the Nazi leader's gun. "We heard many [rumors], from the cook and others. We saw a coffin being carried out of the entrance," Stock said.
The German dictator reportedly had a romantic relationship with Raubal, various sources have suggested, while the exact nature of their relationship remains unknown. Sources have also speculated that Raubal was murdered, rather than having taken her own life.
"There was speculation of how and when she died. I think there was truth in it that the coffin was carried out and in it was a woman. But there was no confirmation ever – and you couldn’t talk openly," she said.
"Once I went to the opera – I got tickets through the school, it was in the royal box," Stock said. "I got there in the evening and there were SS men saying, 'You can't come in here – go two boxes further down.' As the curtain went up I looked at the royal box – and there was Hitler sitting there."
She recalled seeing the dictator on several occasions. "I saw him once or twice coming home, too. His car would draw up," Stock recalled. "Two SS men would jump out, stand either side, and he would rush up to the house – terrified obviously of someone who would try to kill him."
According to Bristol Live, Stock was born in 1918 in a small Bavarian town called Augsburg, where her father worked as a public prosecutor. When she was three months old, her family relocated to Bavaria's capital where her father worked as a High Court judge.
Upon becoming chancellor in 1933, Hitler began spending time at a villa near Brechtesgaden, retaining ownership of the apartment that is deemed the birthplace of the German National-Socialist Workers Party, also known as the Nazi Party.

Leon Sverdelov contributed to this report.