Jewish org. launches campaign to remove antisemitic Farrakhan speech

In Farrakhan’s 4th of July address, he claimed that Jews are responsible for many of the world's problems.

Religious leader Louis Farrakhan gives the keynote speech at the Nation of Islam Saviours' Day convention in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. February 19, 2017. (photo credit: REUTERS/REBECCA COOK)
Religious leader Louis Farrakhan gives the keynote speech at the Nation of Islam Saviours' Day convention in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. February 19, 2017.
(photo credit: REUTERS/REBECCA COOK)
The Combat Anti-Semitism Movement (CAM), a non-partisan organization devoted to fighting antisemitic and anti-Zionist sentiment around the world, launched a campaign Wednesday aimed at pressuring YouTube to remove Louis Farrakhan’s 4th of July address, because it contains a series of incendiary antisemitic comments and tropes, according to a press release from the group.
CAM noted in the press release that Farrakhan’s address, which is still online, was allegedly in clear violation of YouTube’s policies on hate speech.
In his address, Farrakhan claimed that Jews are responsible for many of the world's problems, while suggesting that the head of a leading Jewish civil rights organization is “Satan.”  He further claimed that the American Jewish community was seeking to kill him, saying “Jews tried to poison me; they hate me because I reveal their wickedness,” adding that “if you [Jews] make that move, I can guarantee your destruction.” 
Farrakhan’s speech has garnered nearly 900,000 views since it was livestreamed on YouTube, as part of an American Independence Day event promoted by rapper Sean Combs (aka Puff Daddy/P. Diddy/Diddy) to his millions of Twitter followers.
As part of its campaign, CAM has argued that Farrakhan's speech specifically violates user guidelines by promoting or condoning  "hatred against individuals or groups based on core characteristics such as ethnicity, gender and sexual identity, and religion."
The campaign has been calling on supporters to take action by visiting the video's page and submitting a report to YouTube moderators, in addition to contacting Matt Halprin, vice-president of Global Trust and Safety at YouTube, to try and get the video removed. 
CAM has already taken action in an attempt to remove the video and has sent a letter to Halprin.
"CAM stands ready to support YouTube in clarifying and enforcing its standards when it comes to antisemitism and to act as a resource going forward,” the letter read. In this regard, it notes “The International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of antisemitism, adopted by its 34 country membership, including the United States government, is the recommended standard to identify antisemitism.”  
CAM director Sacha Roytman-Dratwa, commenting on the campaign and Farrakhan's past statements, said that “Louis Farrakhan has a long history of antisemitism, incorporating it into the very legitimate, important fight for civil rights and equality. His perversion of these values by promoting hatred and dehumanization of Jews is quite simply unacceptable.
“We call upon anyone who cares about removing hatred and discrimination from our world, to take part in this campaign and ensure that YouTube does the right thing by removing Farrakhan’s naked incitement against Jews,” Roytman-Dratwa added.