Medical first in Tiberias: Docs save uterus so woman can have more babies

"Since this was a young woman, our goal was to allow her to return to normal functioning while preserving her ability to become pregnant in the future."

Maj. (Dr.) Ted Ferguson performs reconstructive surgery. Used for illustrative purposes (photo credit: MASTER SGT. EFRAIN GONZALEZ/US AIR FORCE PHOTO)
Maj. (Dr.) Ted Ferguson performs reconstructive surgery. Used for illustrative purposes
(photo credit: MASTER SGT. EFRAIN GONZALEZ/US AIR FORCE PHOTO)
For the first time, the Baruch Padeh Medical Center urology and gynecology unit performed pelvic floor lift and uterine preservation surgery on a 32-year-old who suffered from external and severe uterine prolapse, which is considered rare for her age, according to a press release from the medical center. 
"The patient arrived during pregnancy due to an external uterine prolapse that prevented her from functioning. She had to lie in bed all the time. We treated her in the urology clinic throughout the pregnancy," said obstetrics and gynecology department director Prof. Manny Alkalay. "Since this was a young woman, our goal was to allow her to return to normal functioning while preserving her ability to become pregnant in the future." 
The woman was able to give a natural birth in the maternity ward three months ago. However, after the birth, her condition worsened. 
"She said she was unable to function or even walk," said Alkalay. "It should be noted that this is a very unusual case. Only a small percentage of women suffer from uterine prolapse at a young age. It typically happens to women over the age of 55." 
Due to the patient's young age, which would allow her to have another pregnancy in the future, the staff ultimately decided to have her undergo surgery on December 9. 
Alkalay elaborated on the surgery: "This is a relatively rare and complex operation performed with a laparoscopic approach... there are several benefits to surgery performed with this type of approach: The recovery is relatively quick, no large scar remains on the abdomen post-surgery, and we have optimal surgical control of the deep pelvic organs." 
"Cases like these are rare," concluded Prof. Moshe Ben-Ami, director of the Mother and Newborn Division. 
"Surgical repair opens a new therapeutic window for young women with severe pelvic prolapse who seek to heal their condition and preserve their ability to conceive in the future." 

Baruch Padeh Medical Center staff pose before surgery
Baruch Padeh Medical Center staff pose before surgery