Lag Ba'omer: Celebrations resume at Meron, one year after deadly tragedy - watch

One year after the disaster at Meron killed 45 people, police have set up new protocols for this year's celebrations.

Grand Rabbi of Boyan (Hasidic dynasty) lights candles in memory of the 45 lost lives at last year's Mount Meron disaster, during Lag Baomer celebrations, in Meron on May 18, 2022.  (photo credit: David Cohen/Flash90)
Grand Rabbi of Boyan (Hasidic dynasty) lights candles in memory of the 45 lost lives at last year's Mount Meron disaster, during Lag Baomer celebrations, in Meron on May 18, 2022.
(photo credit: David Cohen/Flash90)

The celebrations at Mount Meron for Lag Ba'omer took place on Wednesday night, a year after 45 were killed in a stampede that has been the subject of inquiry since. 

This year, 45 memorial candles were lit in memory of the victims. 

After a brief time where Yamina MK Matan Kahana wasn't Religious Affairs Minister, he resumed the role and was placed in charge of running the event. 

Over the past year, the government has ordered extensive changes at the site, demolishing illegally built structures, including Dov Bridge, and widening existing passageways.

Tickets needed to be preordered in order to enter the event and will serve as both transportation and entry passes. Entry is staggered, with 4,000 people allowed per hour. They will be given passes for a four-hour stay, meaning that no more than 16,000 pilgrims will be on the mountain at any time.

 Grand Rabbi of Boyan (Hasidic dynasty) lights candles in memory of the 45 lost lives at last year's Mount Meron disaster, during Lag Baomer celebrations, in Meron on May 18, 2022.  (credit: David Cohen/Flash90) Grand Rabbi of Boyan (Hasidic dynasty) lights candles in memory of the 45 lost lives at last year's Mount Meron disaster, during Lag Baomer celebrations, in Meron on May 18, 2022. (credit: David Cohen/Flash90)

No private vehicles will be allowed to approach the site, and all public and private transportation will be diverted to 11 bus terminals, from which shuttles will ferry people to the compound.

One bonfire-lighting ceremony will be held; food will not be sold on-site; people will visit the tomb in a moving line, with separate entry and exit lanes and a short duration by the tomb; and a tent will be set up outside for those who wish to remain and pray.