Herzog calls on Israel's politicians to leave Nazi references out of campaigns

Israeli President Isaac Herzog is concerned about the increased violence, both verbal and physical, which is causing fear and is harming society as a whole.

 President Isaac Herzog in his office at Beit Hanassi. (photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM/THE JERUSALEM POST)
President Isaac Herzog in his office at Beit Hanassi.
(photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM/THE JERUSALEM POST)

President Isaac Herzog is extremely concerned about the rising tide of violence – both verbal and physical, which is causing fear and is harming not only individuals, but also society as a whole.

President Herzog's fear

Speaking on Wednesday night at the annual prayer services that he hosts at the synagogue in the grounds of the President’s Residence in conjunction with the 929 Bible Study movement, Herzog said that he was disturbed and worried by the violent incidents of recent days and weeks, which he strongly condemns.

He finds it difficult to sleep at night when thinking about the insulting remarks that are hurled about and which often turn hateful speech into physical assaults and bloodshed.

He also finds it impossible to avoid the disturbing thought of what may come next.

 Israel's President Isaac Herzog is seen addressing the Jerusalem Post annual conference at the Museum of Tolerance in Jerusalem, on October 12, 2021. (credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM/THE JERUSALEM POST) Israel's President Isaac Herzog is seen addressing the Jerusalem Post annual conference at the Museum of Tolerance in Jerusalem, on October 12, 2021. (credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM/THE JERUSALEM POST)

He urged everyone to stop before posting a hateful message on social media or before attacking anyone, so that there will be no need to seek forgiveness or to apologize.

Aware that much of the violence has emanated from people involved in election campaigns, Herzog called on the Israeli people and their leaders from across the political spectrum to raise a voice of moderation and responsibility and not to let the voices of extremism and violence take the lead.

Herzog conceded that arguments have an important place in social discourse, but he declared that differences can be discussed respectfully.

In Herzog’s view, the most galling insult is to accuse members of a rival political party of treason or to compare them to Nazis.