Beit HaNasi displays cartoon exhibit depicting presidents of the years

The exhibit was brought together through the combined efforts of Beit HaNasi's curator Yuval Keshet, Yinon Guttel-Klein and the Israeli Cartoon and Comics Museum in Holon.

Beit HaNasi displays cartoon exhibit depicting presidents of the years (photo credit: PRESIDENT RESIDENCE)
Beit HaNasi displays cartoon exhibit depicting presidents of the years
(photo credit: PRESIDENT RESIDENCE)
With President Reuven Rivlin celebrating his 81st birthday, Beit HaNasi will be displaying an exhibit called "Basic Law/Laugh: President of the State – Israeli presidents in cartoons" in honor of of the president's special day.
The exhibit was brought together through the combined efforts of Beit HaNasi's curator Yuval Keshet, Yinon Guttel-Klein and the Israeli Cartoon and Comics Museum in Holon.
The exhibit will feature 24 cartoons depicting Israeli presidents throughout the years. The works were commissioned by Israeli artists Yosef Bass, Yosef Ross, Dosh (Kariel Gardosh), Arieh Navon, Ze’ev (Ya’akov Farkash), Peretz Weinreich, Shlomo Cohen, Shai Charki, Itamar Doeva, Boris Dickerman, Hanoch Piven, Jacky, Amos Biderman, Michel Kishka, Daniela London Dekel and Tal Lezer.
One of the pieces depicts the meeting between former President Yitzhak Navon and his Egyptian counterpart Anwar Sadat, another depicts Chaim Weizmann and Reuven Rivlin maneuvering challenging election results.
Some even deal with events taking place today, such as Rivlin, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Defense Minister Benny Gantz working to create a unity government - oddly enough involving frogs.
Beit HaNasi displays cartoon exhibit depicting presidents of the years.Beit HaNasi displays cartoon exhibit depicting presidents of the years.
One is a cute depiction of Rivlin wearing a face mask amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic in Israel.
While many of the artists' renditions depict key moments in Israeli history, some are displayed portraits in recognition of past presidents. With this the exhibition hopes to not only tell the history of the presidency, but the story of those who they represented as well, being the artists.
“Through all the chaos, it is important to laugh a little at ourselves, at the impossibility of our situation," Rivlin said at the "Crossing the Rubicon" exhibition in 2015, and as some of the event's depicted in the portraits hold true today, the statement does as well.