Shira Iskov, survivor of murder attempt by husband, receives divorce

Shira Iskov's story shocked the Israeli public when she bravely decided to speak out about what she went through.

Activists protest against recent cases of violence against women at Habima square in Tel Aviv on October 21, 2020.  (photo credit: MIRIAM ALSTER/FLASH90)
Activists protest against recent cases of violence against women at Habima square in Tel Aviv on October 21, 2020.
(photo credit: MIRIAM ALSTER/FLASH90)
Shira Iskov, who survived a murder attempt by her husband, Aviad Moshe, in front of their child on Rosh Hashanah, has received her get (Jewish divorce document) on Tuesday, Chochmat Nashim reported on Twitter.

Shira's story shocked the Israeli public when she bravely decided to speak out and tell about what she went through. 
Shira and Aviad’s story began as a normal relationship.
Platonic friends for over a year, their romantic relationship developed, despite a 13-year age difference, and progressed fairly quickly. They married and while there was conflict like many couples experience, there was never any violence until well into their marriage when Aviad got angry that Shira wouldn’t show him a text message.
He hit her, and she separated from him for some time, returning to her parents in Carmiel. In the following month, Avid convinced her to come back, to give their marriage a second chance, so Shira moved back with him in Tel Aviv to a "normal life", and there were no further incidents, until Rosh Hashanah 2020.
In September, Shira had agreed to move to Mitzpe Ramon for Aviad's work, despite having no support system in the area. While there was no violence, Aviad had been cruel and verbally abusive to Shira. In the evening of Rosh Hashanah, Shira decided to leave Aviad once and for all, and told him she wanted a divorce.
As a response, he beat her with a rolling pin, strangled her and stabbed her 20 times with a kitchen knife, all in front of their screaming infant son.
Her life was spared only because her neighbor, Adi, intervened and heroically broke into the apartment to save her life.
 
Unfortunately, Shira's story of domestic violence is not unique. And many similar stories end tragically. 
Just last week, another victim was added to the list of the women allegedly murdered by their husband, Diana Raz, whose husband, Amir Raz, is a police officer.

On Tuesday night, a rally in Raz's memory was held at Rabin Square in Tel Aviv. The gathering was also held as a protest against domestic violence and violence directed toward women.

Raz was a couples’ mentor and led married pairings through the challenges of overcoming marital complications. She would lead training groups through a program to improve and evolve their personal relationships.

During an argument that broke out between the couple, the alleged murderer told police, he did not know what had come over him, but he had pulled his gun out and fired two shots, one of which hit Raz in the head.
In September, on the same day, two women were allegedly murdered by their spouses.  
Najah Mansoor, 35, was found dead in her Kiryat Haim apartment with signs of violence on her body, and her husband was found shortly afterward running through the streets with a knife.
A few hours later in Beersheba, police found the body of 67-year-old Irina Graribnov in her apartment, after her husband allegedly beat her to death with a hammer.
Emily Schrader, Tamar Beeri, Celia Jean and Tzvi Joffre contributed to this report.