How has the internet reacted to the death of Mahsa Amini?

The official Twitter account of the State of Israel recently issued a response to the death of Mahsa Amini at the hand of the Guidance Patrol of Iran for wearing her Hijab incorrectly.

Women shop at a street in Tehran, Iran, November 29, 2021. (photo credit: MAJID ASGARIPOUR/WANA (WEST ASIA NEWS AGENCY) VIA REUTERS)
Women shop at a street in Tehran, Iran, November 29, 2021.
(photo credit: MAJID ASGARIPOUR/WANA (WEST ASIA NEWS AGENCY) VIA REUTERS)

The official Twitter account of the State of Israel recently issued a response to the death of Iranian woman Mahsa Amini at the hand of the Guidance Patrol of the Islamic Republic of Iran for wearing her Hijab incorrectly. 

“The world must speak out against the brutality of the Iranian Regime,” wrote the account. 

Arrested for not complying with Iran’s strict rules for head coverings on women, 22-year-old Amini ended up in the hospital after the police claimed she had a heart attack. The police denied allegations that she was physically abused despite released footage showing her falling over after getting up from her seat to speak to a police officer. Shown next is her being carried away on a stretcher. 

The Amini family reported no history of heart disease and claimed that security officials have not yet let them see her autopsy report. They also requested that the family bury her in the middle of the night to keep her death quiet.

Iran protest woman shouts 248.88 (credit: AP)Iran protest woman shouts 248.88 (credit: AP)

Amini’s death has sparked outrage as Saeed Dehghan, a well-known Iranian lawyer, called her death a “murder.” Dehghan further explains that Amini hit her head which caused her skill to fracture. 

Iran and their strict rules against women

Sadly, this is not the first time the Islamic Republic in Iran’s strict laws has resulted in conflict and outrage. Women are obligated to wear clothes that disguise their figures and to cover their hair under Islamic law. Women's rights are restricted in Iran, so much so that women are forbidden from watching men’s sports in stadiums. The government elicits strict punishment on women who stick up for themselves. Recently, morality police in Iran have been criticized for increased enforcement of women due to a wave of protests where women publicly removed their hijabs in 2017. It is clear that Iranian law is in dire need of improvement. 

At the risk of being beaten or killed by security forces, antigovernment protests led mostly by women began on Monday in response to Amini’s death. In some protests, similar to those in 2017, women removed their head coverings and waved them around in open disobedience. 

Protests in Tehran included men and women who chanted, “we will fight and take our country back.” Videos shared on social media show security firing gunshots and water cannons and chasing and beating protestors. 

Furthermore, many protests have targeted Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader, who is the center of the regime. Protesters in the northern city of Rasht chanted “death to the dictator” and “death to the oppressor, be it the shah or the supreme leader.” 

It is unknown whether or not justice will be served as protests like these in the past have been oppressed by security forces through harming, killing, and arresting protestors. 

Rightfully, President Ebrahim Raisi has ordered an investigation into Amini’s death. However, this doesn't excuse his recent actions such as his denial of the Holocaust and request for research to verify its authenticity. 

Protests have begun in Israel as people are burning hijabs in different places throughout the country. Israel highly condemns the brutality of the Iranian Regime, as seen through their Twitter post and these protests.