Iran protests continue as demonstrators block roads, defy security forces

Protesting students told Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi to "get lost" after he visited their campus.

 FILE PHOTO: Protesters shout slogans during a demonstration following the death of Mahsa Amini in Iran, in Istanbul, Turkey, October 2, 2022.  (photo credit: REUTERS/Dilara Senkaya/File Photo)
FILE PHOTO: Protesters shout slogans during a demonstration following the death of Mahsa Amini in Iran, in Istanbul, Turkey, October 2, 2022.
(photo credit: REUTERS/Dilara Senkaya/File Photo)

Demonstrators across Iran blocked roads, chanted against the government and clashed with security forces, as anti-government protests continued to escalate over three weeks since Tehran morality police killed Mahsa Amini.

In recent days, activists in Iran had called for largescale protests to be held on Saturday.

Throughout the day on Saturday, protests broke out in Tehran, Mashhad, Sanandaj, Karaj and Babol, among other locations, with demonstrators shouting "death to the dictator," "Ali will be overthrown," "women, life, freedom" and "mullahs get lost," among other slogans.

At Al-Zahra University in Tehran, students protested as Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi visited the campus telling Raisi to "get lost."

People demonstrate during a protest against the Islamic regime of Iran following the death of Mahsa Amini, in central London, Britain, October 8, 2022.  (credit: REUTERS/HENRY NICHOLLS)People demonstrate during a protest against the Islamic regime of Iran following the death of Mahsa Amini, in central London, Britain, October 8, 2022. (credit: REUTERS/HENRY NICHOLLS)

A university student told Reuters on Saturday, "They can kill us, arrest us, but we will not remain silent anymore. Our classmates are in jail. How can we remain silent?"

Videos showed on social medias showed protesters gathering in the streets and blocking roads in multiple cities.

Security forces continued to crackdown on protesters across the country, firing tear gas, rubber bullets and live ammunition towards demonstrators.

In Sanandaj, a number of protesters were reportedly killed by shots fired by Iranian security forces, with the Kurdish Hengaw Organization for Human Rights reporting that three people had been killed on Saturday. Dozens of injuries were reported in the protests as well.

Casualties were reported in other cities across Iran as well, although details remained unclear as of Saturday night.

Despite the crack down, multiple videos shared on social media showed security forces running as protesters chased them away.

As of late Saturday night, protests were reportedly ongoing in Tehran, with protesters blocking central roads in Iran's capital.

Overnight, videos were published on social media showing police walking alongside protesters in Tehran, with one video appearing to show police and other security forces arguing and fighting against each other near a protest.

The Iranian government continued to restrict internet access, with Internet watchdog NetBlocks reporting that internet had been cut in Sanandaj. Mobile network has been disrupted most nights as well.

Hackers broadcast call to join protests on Iran state media

On Saturday evening, the Edalat Ali hacker group hacked the broadcast of Iran's state news agency IRIB, replacing the broadcast with an animation showing a target on Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and the words "Join us and rise up. The blood of our youth is dripping from your hand."

The animation also showed photos of Amini and a number of Iranians killed by security forces amid the protests.

"Wake up and join us in the streets. We will continue our operations until the destruction of the corrupt system," said the Edalat Ali group in a Telegram message.

The Edalat Ali group has claimed a number of hacks against the Iranian government in the past, including a leak of security camera footage within the Evin and Ghezel Hesar Prisons, used to jail political prisoners and those charged with drug-trafficking.

The group has also leaked files related to the 2019-2020 Iranian protests, known as Bloody November.