Scorpion surge endangers Egyptians in Aswan

Following heavy storms in the area, scorpions were forced out of their homes and into houses.

 Arizona bark scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus glowing under ultraviolet light. (photo credit: Wikimedia Commons)
Arizona bark scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus glowing under ultraviolet light.
(photo credit: Wikimedia Commons)

More than 500 people were hospitalized in Egypt this week after being stung by scorpions, according to state-run media.

The surge of scorpion stings comes as a result of extreme downpours and storms in the Aswan province. The storms forced the scorpions out from their underground homes and into houses.

So far, no one has died of a scorpion sting, according to Egypt's acting health minister Khalid Abdel-Ghafar. Those who arrived at hospitals with stings were given antidotes to the venom and later discharged.

Symptoms among victims of scorpion stings included severe pain, fever, sweating, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle tremors and head twitching.

The Ministry of Health assured the public that they had plenty of antidotes to treat any further stings that may occur, according to The Guardian.

Hottentotta tamulus, the Indian red scorpion from Mangaon, Maharashtra, India (credit: SHANTANU KUVESKAR VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS/CC BY-SA 4.0)Hottentotta tamulus, the Indian red scorpion from Mangaon, Maharashtra, India (credit: SHANTANU KUVESKAR VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS/CC BY-SA 4.0)

The mountains in Aswan are home to the Arabian fat-tailed scorpion whose Greek name means "man-killer", and they are considered to be among the most dangerous scorpions in the world.