Arts in Brief: February 23

Yevgeny Arye in Moscow; Lizzy: the satire; Bach and ballet

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF
February 22, 2011 22:17
1 minute read.
Israel Ballet

Israel Ballet dancers 521. (photo credit: Courtesy)

 
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Yevgeny Arye in Moscow

The Gesher Theater’s founding artistic director Yevgeny Arye has been garnering rave reviews from theater critics for his production of Isaac Bashevis Singer’s Enemies, a Love Story at the Sovremennik Theater in Moscow. Comments have ranged from “The No.1 attraction of Moscow theater” to “The stupendous acting in Enemies, a Love Story turns it into an existential drama of enormous significance.”

• Jerusalem Post staff

Lizzy’: the satire

It is 2020. Israel is divided into eight states. There’s a haredi state, a settler state, a Peace Now state and so forth. All the states are fighting fiercely, and a bloody war rages among them until Lizzy and women from each state declare a sex strike. Ephraim Sidon has based his satire on Aristophanes’s 5th-century BCE comedy Lysistrata, bringing it up to date for Israel with music by Rafi Kadishson, directed and choreographed by Daniella Michaeli. It opens at Tzavta on March 2.

• Jerusalem Post staff

Bach and ballet

The National Dance Company of Spain (SNDC) returns to the Tel Aviv Performing Arts Center on March 22, 23 & 25 with Nacho Duato’s meditation on the music of Bach, called Multiplicity, Forms of Silence and Emptiness. He calls Multiplicity musings on the glory of Bach’s music, while the second half of the evening is a more inward look built around the art of the fugue.


In 2000 Duato received the International Dance Award for the work, as well as Spain’s National Dance Award in 2003. Duato, 57, trained in London and danced with many of the world’s great companies, including Jiri Kylian’s Netherlands Dance, where he started to choreograph in 1984. He became SNDC artistic director in 1990, holding the post until 2010.

• Helen Kaye

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