Theater review: The Table

The three puppeteers are masters of their craft and keep the audience chuckling and giggling while Moses confronts God, flirts, natters on.

By HELEN KAYE
June 1, 2013 23:20
1 minute read.
The Table.

The Table 370. (photo credit: Lorna Palmer)

 
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The Table
Blind Summit
Israel Festival, May 28


Actually The Table started life as The Other Seder, depicting “in real time” the last 12 hours of Moses’ life.

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Moses is the Clint Eastwood of puppets, complete with an ironic twist to his lips. He’s a ribbed-cardboard-headed, cloth-bodied, two foot high puppet marvelously, minutely and meticulously moved by Mark Down (head, left hand and voice), Sean Garratt (left hand and bottom), Nick Barnes (wee feet in black patent-leather shoes).

“This,” says Mark, “is extreme, epic, biblical puppetry.”

Well, yes and no: biblical in that Moses and God have a face-off or two, but not really epic or extreme unless you count Moses’ rails and rants on his puppet exploits.

But who cares? The three puppeteers are masters of their craft and keep the audience chuckling and giggling while Moses confronts God, flirts, natters on about German expressionist puppetry and so forth.

The real heart of the show, though, is a puppetry class in which Moses inimitably demonstrates its guiding principles: focus, breathing and fixed point. At an hour plus, the show was a tad overlong, but the tumultuous applause and yells of “bravo” at its end were entirely deserved.

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