Karzai in Pakistan for Taliban reconciliation talks

By REUTERS
June 10, 2011 12:13

 
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ISLAMABAD - Afghan President Hamid Karzai arrived in Islamabad on Friday seeking Pakistan's help to end a 10-year Taliban insurgency, as their mutual ally the United States tries to build on battlefield gains to force a political settlement.

Pakistan is seen as a critical regional player with the clout to help all parties in the conflict reach a settlement. Karzai was due to meet President Asif Ali Zardari and other Pakistani leaders, although no breakthroughs were expected.

Aside from efforts to try to get the Taliban to lay down their arms, the two leaders were likely to discuss how al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden's death could change the dynamics of a region where he has inspired militants for years.


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