Nobel laureate to EU, US: Ban Iran from TV satellites

By REUTERS
November 5, 2013 01:54

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

NEW YORK - Nobel Peace laureate Shirin Ebadi on Monday called on the European Union and United States to ban Iran from using US and European satellites to broadcast what she described as the Islamic Republic's propaganda.

Ebadi, an Iranian lawyer and former judge who won the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize for her work promoting human rights in Iran, also accused Western powers of focusing too little attention on rights abuses as they pursue a deal with Tehran aimed at curbing its nuclear ambitions.

She criticized the economic and financial sanctions regime against Iran, a web of US, EU and UN measures aimed at crippling Tehran's nuclear and missile programs and pressuring the government to abandon what Western powers and their allies suspect is a quest to develop an atomic weapons capability.

"Economic sanctions have impacted powerfully," Ebadi, 66, told Reuters in an interview. "People have become very poor. Some kinds of medications cannot be found in Iran. The price of food is higher in Iran than in the US or Europe."

Related Content

Breaking news
August 15, 2018
U.S. lawsuit over photos at U.S.-Mexico border crossings is revived

By REUTERS