Obama: Rally the world for climate deal next month

Obama Rally the world f

By JPOST.COM
February 8, 2010 17:24
1 minute read.

 
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US President Barack Obama, with China's leader at his side, lifted his sights for a broad accord at next month's climate conference that he said will lead to immediate action and "rally the world" toward a solution on global warming. Obama and President Hu Jintao talked Tuesday of a joint desire to tackle climate change, but failed to publicly address the root problems that could unravel a deal at the 192-nation conference in Copenhagen: how much each country can contribute to curb greenhouse gases and how the world will pay the billions of dollars needed to fight rising temperatures. Hu said nations would do their part "consistent with our respective capabilities," a reference to the now widely accepted view that developing nations - even energy guzzlers like China, India and Brazil - should be required only to set goals for reining in greenhouse-gas emissions, not accept absolute targets for reducing emissions like the industrialized countries. Nonetheless, the symbolism of the world's two largest polluters pledging no half-measures in an agreement during the Dec. 7-18 conference took the sting out of the admission by Obama and other leaders over the weekend that Copenhagen would be only a way station rather than the endpoint envisioned two years ago when negotiations for a new climate treaty began.

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