Netanyahu orders silence on anti-gov't protests in Egypt

Security officials however say they worry violence could threaten ties and spread into Palestinian Authority.

By ASSOCIATED PRESS
January 29, 2011 12:20
1 minute read.
Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu

Netanyahu Evil Genius 311. (photo credit: Associated Press)

 
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Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu has ordered silence on anti-government protests in neighboring Egypt but security officials said they worry the violence could threaten ties and spread to the Palestinian Authority.

Speaking on condition of anonymity, the two officials said Netanyahu had told all government spokesmen not to comment on the situation in Egypt.

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The security officials said they are worried that a regime change could threaten Israeli-Egyptian relations and that violence could spread to the Palestinian Authority.

Egypt was the first Arab country to reach peace with Israel three decades ago and is one an important ally.

Egyptians have taken to the streets en masse calling on President Hosni Mubarak to resign after nearly 30 years in power.

Click here for full Jpost coverage of unrest in 
Egypt

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