'Charlie Hebdo,' brazen champion of political incorrectness, loved poking fun at Islam

In 2006, it riled Muslims in France and elsewhere after it reprinted 12 cartoons originally published months earlier by Jylland-Posten, a Danish newspaper.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
January 7, 2015 15:25
2 minute read.
Copies of the French satirical weekly "Charlie Hebdo" are seen in its Paris newsroom

Copies of the French satirical weekly "Charlie Hebdo" are seen in its Paris newsroom. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Charlie Hebdo, the Paris-based satirical newsmagazine that was targeted by two gunmen in one of the most brutal terrorist attacks in the history of the Fifth Republic, has been available on French newsstands since its founding in July 1992.

It gained its greater notoriety, however, for its defiant stance toward upholding freedom of expression in the face of Muslim anger over depictions of the Prophet Mohammed.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


In 2006, it riled Muslims in France and elsewhere after it reprinted 12 cartoons originally published months earlier by Jylland-Posten, a Danish newspaper. The caricatures sparked rioting and widespread protests across the Muslim world.

Charlie Hebdo’s act of solidarity with Jylland-Posten prompted a French Muslim organization to take the newspaper to court, charging that it was fomenting racism by publishing the cartoons. A French court, however, disagreed, and acquitted the newspaper.

An anti-establishment weekly whose Paris offices were under police protection due to threats, Charlie Hebdo continued to make waves. In 2011, it issued a tongue-in-cheek edition titled Charia Hebdo with “guest editor” Mohammed.

On the day before the edition hit newsstands, its offices were firebombed and its website hacked.

In September 2012, Charlie Hebdo ran a series of cartoons depicting a naked Mohammed. Fearing attacks on its diplomatic missions abroad, the French government ordered beefed-up security at embassies and consulates in Muslim countries.



Most recently, the newspaper ran a cartoon of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.












Related Content

Which party makes the most use of the parliamentary tools available (August 14, 2018).
August 14, 2018
Which party's MK's are most active in Knesset?

By JPOST.COM STAFF