Dutch member of Nazi death squad who killed resistance fighters dies in jail at 92

Heinrich Boere was convicted in 2010 in one of Germany's last Nazi trials of killing 3 Dutch civilians.

By REUTERS
December 2, 2013 18:35
1 minute read.
Heinrich Boere

Heinrich Boere 370. (photo credit: Reuters)

 
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BERLIN - A 92-year-old Dutch former member of a Nazi death squad who lived unpunished in Germany for decades until his conviction in 2010 died on Sunday of natural causes in a German prison, justice officials said on Monday.

Heinrich Boere, once high on the Simon Wiesenthal Center's list of most wanted crime suspects, was convicted in 2010 in one of Germany's last Nazi trials of killing three Dutch civilians in 1944 as an Waffen SS squad member targeting anti-Nazi resistance fighters. He was sentenced to life in prison.

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Boere, who was unrepentant during his six-month trial in Aachen and said he was only following orders, had lived a quiet life in Germany after World War Two even though he was a wanted man in the Netherlands.

Boere was captured by US forces in the Netherlands after the war and confessed to killing the three civilians: a chemist in Breda, a bicycle seller and another man in Voorschoten.

But he escaped in 1947 and fled to Germany before being sentenced to death in absentia in the Netherlands in 1949.

A German court refused a Dutch request for Boere's extradition in 1980, only to indict him 28 years later.

Germany has sought to prosecute the last surviving war crime suspects and improve its patchy post-war record of bringing former Nazis to justice.

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