Hitler's 'Mein Kampf' to hit German bookstores for first time since WWII

News of the book’s reissue has upset Holocaust survivors who say that publishing Hitler’s work anew risks perpetuating his message.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
February 25, 2015 14:37
A young Czech woman reads a copy of Hitler's manifesto Mein Kampf in a central Prague's bookstore

A young Czech woman reads a copy of Hitler's manifesto Mein Kampf in a central Prague's bookstore. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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For the first time since the end of World War II, Germans will be able to buy copies of Adolf Hitler’s memoir Mein Kampf.

According to TIME magazine, a state-funded research center will be reissuing the book in December, when the German copyright, which is owned by the state of Bavaria, expires.

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Since the end of the war, the German authorities have banned reprinting the book.

The Institute of Contemporary History will publish a special 2,000-page edition filled with annotations, analysis, and criticism. The institute believes Mein Kampf to be of historical and educational value.

News of the book’s reissue has upset Holocaust survivors who say that publishing Hitler’s work anew risks perpetuating its message.

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