UN to question Lebanese banker in Hariri case

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April 27, 2007 02:08

 
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A United Nations panel investigating the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri will question a fugitive Lebanese banker arrested in Brazil over a year ago, the foreign ministry said Thursday. Rana Koleilat, also under investigation for a multimillion-dollar (euro) fraud at the Lebanese bank where she once worked, was arrested in Sao Paulo on March 12, 2006 for allegedly trying to bribe police officers who located her for Interpol. "A UN commission wanting to know what she knows about Hariri's assassination is scheduled to question her on Monday," said a foreign ministry spokesman, who declined to be identified in accordance with department policy. He said Koleilat will most likely be questioned at the Sao Paulo headquarters of the federal police where she is being held. UN investigators want to ask Koleilat about whether money that disappeared from the Al-Madina Bank where she worked was used to finance the February 2005 truck bombing that killed Hariri.

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