'Nuclear report based on Iranian notes'

NY Times: Officials were recorded expressing dismay at decision to stop weapons program.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
December 6, 2007 09:29
1 minute read.
'Nuclear report based on Iranian notes'

Iran Nuclear 224.88. (photo credit: AP [file])

 
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The new US intelligence assessment which stated that Iran halted its nuclear weapons program four years ago was based mainly on notes acquired last summer from discussions between Iranian military officials, senior intelligence and government officials told The New York Times on Thursday. The notes reportedly detailed conversations in which certain army officials complained about Iranian leaders' 2003 decision to shut down efforts to develop nuclear weapons. The notes gave no clue as to why Iran had decided to stop weapons development. The information contained in the notes was supported by other intelligence, including conversations between Iranian officials which had been intercepted in recent months, the paper reported. The sources quoted by the paper added that the Central Intelligence Agency and other agencies had looked into the possibility that the information obtained may have been part of an Iranian disinformation campaign, but eventually rejected that possibility. However, the new report did not reject the possibility that some aspects of the Iranian nuclear weapons program remain active, the paper said. Meanwhile, US Vice President Dick Cheney on Thursday said he had no reason to doubt the intelligence assessment. "There's always the possibility that circumstances will change. But I think they've done the best job they can with the intelligence that's available," Cheney told Politico.com. The vice president stressed that the administration would not change its policy towards Iran. "We still think there's a need to continue the course we've been on to persuade the Iranians not to enrich uranium," he said.

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