17% increase in 'summer layoffs'

According to data provided by the Employment Services, the phenomenon is especially popular among preschool teachers, school teachers and nannies.

By LEON SVERDLOV
September 15, 2019 07:23
1 minute read.
The Bnei Brak Employment Center

The Bnei Brak Employment Center. (photo credit: Courtesy)

 2019 saw a 17-percent increase in "summer unemployment" compared to 2018, and a 26-percent increase compared to 2017, the Employment Service said last week.

According to the Employment Service, between June 20 and the end of August, 20,895 people showed up at employment offices to report their unemployment, while expecting to return to their workplace after the summer break, compared to 17,408 in 2018.
"Summer unemployment" is a common phenomenon in the education system, the service said in a press release. The employer ousts the employees so as to avoid paying them during the break, while the employees' salary is replaced with an unemployment benefit until the start of the school year.


"The summary of the summer period data show that the phenomenon of 'summer layoffs' has been expanding for several years," said Rami Garor, Director General of the Employment Service. "The data show that 90 percent of those laid off are women, and the bureau has concluded that they come from the Haredi (Ultra-Orthodox) sector – an alarming figure indicating further damage to the disadvantaged."


"In order to assist those who have been laid off, we announced early in the summer that they could report to the employment offices only once during the period," Garor said, urging employers to "safeguard their employees' rights and take action to reduce the phenomenon."


According to data provided by the Employment Services, the phenomenon is especially popular among preschool teachers, school teachers and nannies. 


Summer ousts are also common among cleaners, caregivers and inexperienced workers.


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