President Rivlin visits DMZ between North and South Korea

The Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) serves as a buffer zone between the two Koreas, and is considered one of the world's most hostile borders.

By ALEX WINSTON
July 17, 2019 12:15
2 minute read.
Israeli President Reuven Rivlin overlooks North Korea from the DMZ, South Korea, July 2019

Israeli President Reuven Rivlin overlooks North Korea from the DMZ, South Korea, July 2019. (photo credit: KOBI GIDEON/GPO)

Israeli President Reuven Rivlin visited the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) between South and North Korea on Wednesday, on a visit strengthening ties between Israel and South Korea.


Several agreements of cooperation between Israeli academic institutions and their South Korean counterparts were signed by Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Education Yoo Eun-hae and Chair of the Planning and Budgeting Committee of the Council for Higher Education Prof. Yaffa Zilbershats.
The agreements signed include future programs for student exchanges between the two countries, joint research and cooperation in the fields of innovation, entrepreneurship and nanotechnology.

“For both South Korea, and Israel learning, education, and excellence are the highest goal. For both people, education lies at the heart of every family’s dream," Rivlin said.

After the signing of the agreements, the President toured the DMZ between the South Korean and North Korean border. As is custom for visiting world leaders, Rivlin signed a brick in a wall at the border.


Alongside the brick signed by the President lay another brick upon which Nechama Rivlin's name was written, dedicated to her memory. During his tour of the DMZ, Rivlin heard a briefing by armed forces patrolling the border, toured the border area of the UN forces stationed there and took time to look out over North Korea.


"We're in one of the places in the world that is truly the mouth of a volcano. And yet the balance between the two forces means they ensure that hostility does not break out. The whole world is watching what happens, similar to the way it views the Middle East," Rivlin said. "Being here, you can see, learn and understand how volatile places can endanger global peace."

The Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) serves as a buffer zone between the two Koreas, and is considered one of the world's most hostile borders.


Related Content

August 22, 2019
LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT

By HANNAH BROWN

Cookie Settings