UK PM heralds economic ties with Israel, attacks 'illegal' settlements

The UK leader also reiterated her support for the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance's new guidelines defining antisemitism, which Britain announce it would adopt on Monday.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
December 13, 2016 16:39
1 minute read.
Theresa May emerges to speak to reporters after being confirmed as the leader of the Conservative Pa

Theresa May emerges to speak to reporters after being confirmed as the leader of the Conservative Party... (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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British Prime Minister Theresa May on Wednesday praised UK-Israeli business ties, saying she hoped to strengthen bilateral economic relations further in the post-Brexit future.

May, speaking before the Conservative Friends of Israel parliamentary group, heralded relations between the two countries and called for greater cooperation on healthcare, cyber security and counter-terrorism, according to The Jewish Chronicle.

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The British premier also reiterated her support for the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance's new guidelines defining antisemitism, which Britain announced it would adopt on Monday.

Adopting the definition formulated earlier this year by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) is meant to make it harder for people to get away with discriminatory or prejudiced behavior due to unclear or differing definitions of what antisemitism actually is.

"It means there will be one definition of antisemitism - in essence, language or behavior that displays hatred towards Jews because they are Jews - and anyone guilty of that will be called out on it,"  May said earlier in the week.

During her speech before an audience of more than 800, the Chronicle reported, the British Prime Minster said that the Balfour declaration had been "one of the most important letters in history."

But May also said there was still "more to do," especially concerning Israel's "illegal" housing construction over the Green Line, stating they "were not conducive to peace" and insisting they "must stop."



May also saved criticism for her main political opponents in Parliament, lambasting the Labour party's suggested lackluster approach to tackling Jew-hatred across the country, accusing the faction of "turning a blind eye to antisemitism."

Also in attendance was Ambassador to the UK Mark Regev, along with 200 Conservative lawmakers and officials from Cyprus, Australia and India.

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