The war, the Holocaust and after in Poland and Hungary

The topic was the subject of a conference organized by the Institute for Polish Jewish Studies at the Polish Embassy in London.

By MONTE JACOBSON
May 3, 2019 05:49
The war, the Holocaust and after in Poland and Hungary

The Polin Museum of the History of Polish Jews and Monument to the Ghetto Heroes. (photo credit: COURTESY POLISH EMBASSY LONDON)

 
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Between autumn 1939 and spring 1945, some six million of Europe’s men, women and children were murdered because they were Jews. Most came from two of the largest communities, Poland and Hungary. This is the second part of an article comparing experiences in those countries before, during and after the Second World War, the subject of a conference organized by the Institute for Polish Jewish Studies at the Polish Embassy in London on January 29 this year.

The first part, published in The Jerusalem Report of April 8, outlined the history of the communities up to 1939. Although the war and the Holocaust have been exhaustively documented, new research, new interpretations and even new testimonies continue to appear. The conference, together with the Institute’s Polin yearbook that it launched, offered the fruits of much original academic work. Prof. Tim Cole of Bristol University brought a social historian’s perspective to the history of the ghettos, while Dr. Anna Manchin described how new museums are explaining and commemorating the history of the Jewish communities and the Holocaust.

The war and its aftermath


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