Haifa park to be dedicated to Righteous Gentiles

Among the memorials will be one to Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish-born humanitarian who saved an estimated 15,000 Jews during the Holocaust.

By MIRIAM BULWAR DAVID-HAY (TRANSLATED)
May 11, 2008 13:12

 
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A public garden to be dedicated to the 17 Righteous Gentiles who lived in Haifa will be inaugurated in the Ramat Alon neighborhood soon, the first such memorial to Righteous Gentiles in Israel, reports Yediot Haifa. The garden will contain 17 seating areas detailing the stories of the Righteous Gentiles, five of whom are still alive today. According to the report, among the memorials will be one to Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish-born humanitarian who saved an estimated 15,000 Jews during the Holocaust by issuing them with Swedish passports. Wallenberg lived on Rehov Arlozoroff in Haifa in the mid-1930s and worked at the local branch of the Holland Bank before returning to Sweden before World War II. During the war he worked for the Swedish embassy in Europe, and afterwards, in 1945, he was arrested by the Soviets for unknown reasons. Wallenberg died in Moscow's Lubyanka prison in 1947. The other 16 Righteous Gentiles all moved to Israel after World War II and settled in Haifa.

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