Egypt court bans all Muslim Brotherhood activities

Court orders seizure of the Brotherhoods's funds.

By REUTERS
September 23, 2013 15:39
1 minute read.
Muslim Brotherhood supporters protest in Cairo, August 30, 2013.

Muslim Brotherhood supporters protest in Cairo 370. (photo credit: Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters)

 
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CAIRO - An Egyptian court on Monday banned the Muslim Brotherhood from carrying out any activities in the country and ordered the seizure of the group's funds, widening a campaign to debilitate the Islamist movement of deposed President Mohamed Morsi.

"The court bans the activities of the Muslim Brotherhood organization and its non-governmental organization and all the activities that it participates in and any organization derived from it," said the presiding judge Mohammed al-Sayed.

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The court ordered the government to seize the Brotherhood's funds and administer its frozen assets.

The army-backed government is waging the toughest crackdown in decades on the Islamist group, which says it has a million members. Security forces killed hundreds of its supporters and rounded up thousands more since Morsi was deposed by the army on July 3 after mass protests against his rule.

The Brotherhood won parliamentary and presidential elections after veteran autocrat Hosni Mubarak was overthrown in 2011.

Army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi's toppling of Morsi triggered a political crisis in the Arab world's most populous state, with the Brotherhood insisting that a military coup robbed them of power.

The court decision is likely to drive more Brotherhood members underground and it may encourage young Islamists to take up arms against the state.

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