Palestinian factions to discuss crisis

Abbas calls for conference of all factions to deal with international isolation.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
April 29, 2006 21:41
abbas reviews honor huard

abbas 298.88 ap. (photo credit: AP [file])

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas called a conference of all the Palestinian factions for next week in order to find a solution to the financial crisis caused by the cessation of international donations following Hamas's election victory in January. Invitees to the conference include senior government officials, city mayors and leading business figures. Meanwhile, the London-based a-Sharq al-Awsat reported on Saturday that Hamas leaders were discussing new policy plans in an attempt to remove the international isolation. According to the report, several of the movement's members, including lawmakers and those still in Israeli prisons, were convinced that Hamas should officially accept the principles of the Saudi peace plan, presented at the Arab summit in Beirut in 2000. The plan includes the Palestinian recognition of Israel in exchange for an Israeli withdrawal to the Green Line, the ceasefire line between Israel and Jordan from 1949 to 1967. It also calls for the establishment of a Palestinian state with its capital in east Jerusalem and an unspecified solution to the Palestinian refugee problem. Several Arab states, including Egypt and Saudi Arabia, were pressuring Hamas to accept the plan.

Related Content

S-300
July 16, 2018
Iranian general praises Gazan terror: Trump’s ‘threats don’t scare us’

By KHALED ABU TOAMEH