Twitter, YouTube blocked in Turkey over hostage photo

A total of 166 websites that published the photo of the prosecutor, who was eventually killed in a raid to free him, were ordered by a Turkish court to be blocked, Hurriyet reports.

By JPOST.COM STAFF, REUTERS
April 6, 2015 14:42
1 minute read.
A gunman poses with prosecutor Mehmet Selim Kiraz with a gun on his head after he was taken hostage

A gunman poses with prosecutor Mehmet Selim Kiraz with a gun on his head after he was taken hostage in his office in a court house in Istanbul. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

ANKARA/ISTANBUL - Turkey blocked access to Twitter and YouTube on Monday over the publication of photographs of an Istanbul prosecutor held at gunpoint by far-left militants hours before he was killed in a shootout last week, officials said.

Presidential spokesman Ibrahim Kalin said a prosecutor had sought the block on access to social media sites because some media organizations had acted "as if they were spreading terrorist propaganda" in sharing the images.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


"This has to do with the publishing of the prosecutor's picture. What happened in the aftermath (of the prosecutor's killing) is as grim as the incident itself," Kalin said.

"The demand from the prosecutor's office is that this image not be used anywhere in electronic platforms," he told a news conference in Ankara.

Istanbul prosecutor Mehmet Selim Kiraz died from his wounds last Tuesday after security forces stormed the office where members of the far-left Revolutionary People's Liberation Party-Front (DHKP-C) had taken him hostage.

His two captors were also killed.

The DHKP-C had published a picture of Kiraz with a gun to his head and said it would kill him unless its demands were met.



"The wife and children of prosecutor Kiraz have been deeply upset. The images are everywhere," a senior Turkish official told Reuters.

"A request has been made to both Twitter and YouTube for the removal of the images and posts but they have not accepted it and no response has been given. That's why this decision has been taken through a court in Istanbul."

Twitter and YouTube could not immediately be reached for comment. Turkey's telecoms regulator also could not immediately be reached and there was no statement on its website.

Turkey temporarily blocked Twitter and YouTube in the run-up to local elections in March 2014, after audio recordings purportedly showing corruption in then-Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan's inner circle were leaked on their sites. That decision caused a public uproar and drew heavy international criticism.

Turkey filed over five times more content-removal requests to Twitter than any other country in the second half of 2014, data published in February by the micro-blogging site showed. Last year, Turkey tightened laws allowing sites to be blocked by the authorities more easily.

Related Content

July 22, 2018
Israel evacuates hundreds of Syrian 'White Helmets' in humanitarian effort

By SETH J. FRANTZMAN