Survey shows med school applications on the rise

Study by the Council for Higher Education indicates on drop in application to law and business programs in Israeli universities.

By
October 11, 2012 05:25
Doctors (illustrative)

Doctors perform surgery (generic) R 370. (photo credit: REUTERS/Swoan Parker)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Medicine remains the most in-demand study track in Israeli universities, while the number of applicants for law and business programs has dropped, according to a recent study by the Council for Higher Education.

The council’s figures show that 1,600 students competed for only 440 available spots in the country’s medical schools this year. The acceptance rate for faculties of medicine in 2012 is one out of four applicants, remaining constant since 1990.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


The number of students interested in law and business administration programs, however, has significantly fallen from its peak in 2005, when the number of recorded candidates reached 2,190. This year, faculties received 1,405 applications for such programs, and 785 students were accepted – the same number as in 2005.

Acceptance criteria in universities across the country have become more and more difficult to meet in the past few years, driving an increasing number of students to turn to private colleges as an alternative.

Out of the 31,000 students who applied to local universities this past year, only about 18,600 of them were accepted.

Related Content

Riot
August 31, 2014
Rioting resumes throughout east Jerusalem Saturday night

By DANIEL K. EISENBUD