Dozens of Jewish refugees arrive in Moldova, Chabad emissaries assist

Chabad emissaries in Moldova, Rabbi Mendy Gotzel and Rabbi Shmuel Zalmanov, assist in the preparations for the absorption of refugees.

 Dozens of Jewish refugees arrived in Moldova; Chabad emissaries assist. (photo credit: CHABAD OF MOLDOVA)
Dozens of Jewish refugees arrived in Moldova; Chabad emissaries assist.
(photo credit: CHABAD OF MOLDOVA)

First refugees from the war in Ukraine crossed the border into Moldova at noon and arrived at the center of the Jewish community in the capital, Kishinev, headed by the state's chief rabbi, Rabbi Yosef-Yitzhak Abelsky.

Rabbi Mandy Axelrod, a Chabad emissary in the country, said: “In addition to the refugees who have already arrived, people are calling us from Ukraine saying that they want to come. It is a complex timing, especially because of the Sabbat, and it requires us to address and prepare."

"The community's general manager, Rabbi Zosha Abelsky, instructed us to prepare in advance, we bought many groceries and the preparations here are in full swing."

Chabad emissaries in Moldova, Rabbi Mendy Gotzel and Rabbi Shmuel Zalmanov, assist in the preparations for the absorption of refugees. Rabbi Zalmanov added: "According to estimates, hundreds more Jews will arrive tomorrow, most of them Israelis. We will also help with accommodation as much as we can."

 Dozens of Jewish refugees arrived in Moldova; Chabad emissaries assist. (credit: CHABAD OF MOLDOVA) Dozens of Jewish refugees arrived in Moldova; Chabad emissaries assist. (credit: CHABAD OF MOLDOVA)

Rabbi Goetzl added: "We ourselves in Moldova fear a Russian invasion, because we may be the next target. Despite everything, the Chabad emissaries remain here in prayer and hope that the war will end soon."

The leaders and rabbis of the Federation of Jewish Communities in Ukraine, an umbrella organization in the country with 160 communities across Ukraine, have decided that the rabbis will stay in the various cities to be with the local population at this difficult time, and not leave the country.

The issue of women and children also came up in the discussion. In the virtual discussion, it was unanimously decided that the families would also stay, because at this time it is better to be in houses and not move on the roads, for fear of bombing that can, God forbid, cause casualties.

Federation chairman Rabbi Meir Stumbler said: “We stay and pray for the good. Our job is to be with the communities, to help and reassure as much as possible in this war. There is already a shortage of groceries, people are hysterical that despite everything, no one believed that there would indeed be a comprehensive attack on Ukraine. We organized water, food and medicine - including flour and dry products - that will last for a few weeks and will distribute them to Holocaust survivors, the elderly, the disabled and the disabled so that they can stay in their homes."

In addition, the Federation of Jewish Communities in Ukraine has decided to invest a lot of resources and money to secure hundreds of Jewish synagogues and institutions in the country, in order to prevent looting and harassment by antisemites. It is time to call on those who can help with this, we need help financing the many expenses."

The rabbis and leaders of the communities in Ukraine called on the Jews of the world to "pray, give charity and do good deeds. The battle between Russia and Ukraine is undoubtedly a sign of redemption."