Two-thirds of Americans support climate change policies - survey

Even more believe a transition to renewable energy would not happen fast enough to prevent severe climate catastrophes • half say even global effort won't be enough

US President Joe Biden walks to deliver a speech during "Action on Forests and Land-Use" event at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland, Britain, November 2, 2021 (photo credit: REUTERS)
US President Joe Biden walks to deliver a speech during "Action on Forests and Land-Use" event at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland, Britain, November 2, 2021
(photo credit: REUTERS)

Some 69% of Americans support steps taken by the United States to become carbon neutral by 2050, a new Pew Research Center report released on Tuesday has found.

In addition, the same percentage of Americans believe the US should prioritize the development of renewable energy over the expansion of the coal, oil and natural gas industries.

Despite the majority in favor of renewable energy, more respondents (72%) said they believe a transition to renewable energy would not happen fast enough to prevent severe climate catastrophes. 

Moreover, over half (53%) of Americans believe that even a global effort will not be enough to combat the full effect of climate change.

 Delegates stand at a pavilion at the media centre during the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26), in Glasgow, Scotland, Britain, November 4, 2021. (credit: REUTERS/YVES HERMAN) Delegates stand at a pavilion at the media centre during the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26), in Glasgow, Scotland, Britain, November 4, 2021. (credit: REUTERS/YVES HERMAN)

The report also found that views on climate change and energy issues continue to be divided by partisan affiliation. 

Republicans, as well as Republican-leaning independents, give greater priority to expanding the production of oil, coal and natural gas than Democrats.

Among Democrats, an overwhelming majority supports the development of alternative energy sources.

The report, which surveyed 10,237 Americans, notes that it was conducted in January, prior to Russia's invasion of Ukraine and the subsequent uncertainty in global energy markets.