Chinese portal Taobao breaks the internet with ‘Buddha-Trump’

The statue of the former US President, clad in a robe and seeming to meditate, is marketed under the slogan “make your company great again!”

Trump sought the world's attention and got it. Now the White House reality show ends (photo credit: REUTERS)
Trump sought the world's attention and got it. Now the White House reality show ends
(photo credit: REUTERS)
A statue of former US President Donald Trump clad in a robe and seeming to meditate is being offered on the Chinese portal Taobao in a variety of sizes, and is getting a great deal of interest, Global Times reported on Wednesday. 
The statue of the former US president, clad in a robe and seeming to meditate, is marketed under the slogan “make your company great again!” 
The portal described the product as "Trump, who knows Buddhism better than anyone” and offers it from the biggest size (14-foot) at roughly $614 to the smallest (5-foot) for just $153. 
Dozens of works had been sold and the seller, based in Xiamen, Fujian province, told Global Times “most people just buy it for fun.”
One man, who lives in Shanghai, told the publication that Trump can be regarded “as a representative of an era and extreme egoism.” 
The man said that “now the era has passed, but I want the statue to remind me: Don’t be too Trump.”
The Chinese portal also sells a Trump-like toilet brush, the Insider noted. 
Trump was raised in the Christian tradition and his family worshipped at Marble Collegiate, created by the preacher Norman Vincent Peale. Peale is known for writing the 1952 book The Power of Positive Thinking, CNN reported.
The Buddha, an Indian prince who chose to leave a life of luxury to search for truth after he realized all human life must lead to aging, sickness and death. Had been one of the most influential teachers of religion and morality among the cultures of the world. 
While it is unknown what Trump thinks regarding the message of the Indian sage. The historical teacher shared at least one thing in common with Peale, both men believed in the power of thought. 
However, the Buddha suggested that rather than employing it to seek worldly goods – it would be better to experience the “emptiness” of language in relation to ultimate reality.