Jerusalem highlights: November 26-December 2

What's new in Israel's capital in the upcoming week.

 KARP HOUSE at Kibbutz Ashdot Yaakov Ichud, by artist Arik Koren and architect  Erich Rusch, is included in Place, Architect, Artist. (photo credit: (Lior Avitan 2020, courtesy Beit Uri and Rami Nehoshtan Museum)
KARP HOUSE at Kibbutz Ashdot Yaakov Ichud, by artist Arik Koren and architect Erich Rusch, is included in Place, Architect, Artist.
(photo credit: (Lior Avitan 2020, courtesy Beit Uri and Rami Nehoshtan Museum)

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 26

The 2020 Bulgarian Oscar-nominated film Fear by director Ivaylo Hristov will be screened three times today (5:15, 7:15 & 9:15 p.m.) at the Jerusalem Cinematheque and is worth noticing for its bold and funny treatment of a very real and complicated issue – migrants attempting to reach the EU from neighboring countries. 

A village widow (Svetlana Yancheva) meets an African migrant (Michael Fleming) and attempts to do the right thing and aid him, as her community is being overwhelmed by Afghan migrants. This award-winning black and white film follows the 2014 film The Judgment, directed by Stephan Komandarev, which depicts an unemployed Bulgarian man (Assen Blatechki) pushed into leading such migrants from Turkey to the EU to make ends meet. 

NIS 40 per ticket, phone (02) 565-4333 to order. The film is in English and Bulgarian, with Hebrew subtitles.

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 27

For those interested in a day trip outside the capital, two new exhibitions at Beit Uri and Rami Nehoshtan Museum at Kibbutz Ashdot Yaakov Meuhad look promising. The first “Place, Architect, Artist” offers a unique look into how Israeli architecture had been shaped by a sense of locality. The second, Moshe Saidi’s “Artist’s Wall” is a respectful exploration of Saidi. A student of, among others, British artist Henry Moore, Saidi had been creating massive ceramic works for nearly six decades. Curator Michael Jacobson, who wrote about Saidi extensively in his Hebrew art blog “Back Window,” curated both exhibitions. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.  (04) 675-7737 or email [email protected] to learn more about visiting hours. 

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 28

Maureen Nehedar presents I Will Find a Homeland” at 8 p.m. at the Aspaklaria Theater (First Station, 4 David Remez St.) as part of the Melodies and Miracles Festival of Jewish Music. Nehedar is one of the leading singers in the style of Jewish musical renewal. Following the success of her 2016 album Gole Gandom, which included Persian classical and folk music, her soon-to-be released 2022 album will explore Iranian pop and rock music. Those interested might explore the music of Kourosh Yaghmaei and Faramarz Aslani ahead of the release. Other shows include Broken Hallelujah – The Jewish Music of Leonard Cohen (Monday at 8 p.m.) and The Israeli Ladino Orchestra (Saturday, December 4 at 9 p.m.). For tickets call (02) 651-1936 or visit the site www.aspaklaria.org. NIS 80 at the box office/ NIS 60 at pre-purchase. 

 The Consul, the Tramp, and America’s Sweetheart by John Morogiello (credit: Courtesy) The Consul, the Tramp, and America’s Sweetheart by John Morogiello (credit: Courtesy)

MONDAY NOVEMBER 29 

“Light Up the City” is a new Hanukkah menorah tour offered in the Jewish Quarter, in English, by the Tower of David Museum. Wander the alleys and courtyards of the Jewish Quarter guided by the light of the menorahs in the windows and doorways. For ages 7 years and up; wear warm clothes and good walking shoes. NIS 55 per person. 4:30 p.m. Meeting: At the box office of the Tower of David Museum. Register ahead at phone *2884 or visit: www.tod.org.il/en/tour-Light_up_the_city

TUESDAY NOVEMBER 30 

“Cheder” is a new exhibition which concludes the artist residency program at HaMiffal art center. It includes works by Haya Ozar, Idan Sitbon, Yarden Peikin, Daniel (Kizman) Kep, and Sheer Klein. Curated by Meydad Eliyahu, these works explore the act of drawing, as visitors don headphones to hear recordings of the artists; patrons are invited to add their own drawings as well. 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 3 Hamaaravim St. Free admission.

The Consul, the Tramp, and America’s Sweetheart by John Morogiello won awards since it was first put on the stage in 2015; it recounts how the German consul in Hollywood, working for Nazi Germany, attempted to prevent Charlie Chaplin’s The Great Dictator from being made. It is being staged here by the Ben Bard Players, and directed by Barak Bard with actors David Golinkin, Jason Feigen, Anna Kostina, and Sarrica Fink. This is an English-language production to delight all those with even a passing interest in World War II, comedy, and how to fight evil. At the Khan Theater in English on November 30, December 1, 2, 7, 8. (Showtime tonight at 8 p.m.; all other dates at 8:30 p.m.) Tickets are NIS 85, available at www.khan.co.il/eng or tel. (02) 630-3600

THURSDAY DECEMBER 2 

The New Gate of the Old City will be hosting live musical concerts from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saxophonist Eyal Talmudi, his brother the organ player Assaf Talmudi, and drummer Roy Chen will get the evening going with their band Malox. The Jerusalem-born quintet Gute Gute will give their best ethno-pop party rock to the live crowd and the night will end with Laviot by Yael Lavie, which focuses on cutting edge Arab music. Free parking from 7 p.m. at the Safra Square parking space near the New Gate culture center, Hasha’ar Hechadash Street. Site, in Hebrew: www.thenewgate.co.il/Free admission.

The Gursha Ethiopian restaurant (28 Jaffa Rd.) invites you to a special 5 p.m. event to mark the release of a Hebrew version of The Big Buna Bash by Sara Arnold. The book is about a little girl named Almaz (Diamond in Amharic) who overcomes social issues by throwing a big buna coffee event for her peers. Buna is the unique coffee drinking method enjoyed by Ethiopians. To learn more, visit the author’s site: www.saraarnoldbooks.com/ 

Throwing a good party? Opening an art exhibition or a new bar? Bringing in a guest speaker to introduce a fascinating topic? Why not drop me a line at [email protected] and let In Jerusalem know about it? Send email with “Jerusalem Highlights” in the subject line. While all information is welcome, receiving such notifications is not a guarantee they will be featured in the column.