Boston bombs were detonated by remote used for toy cars

By REUTERS
April 25, 2013 03:28

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

WASHINGTON - The two bombs that went off at the Boston Marathon, killing three people and wounding 264, were detonated with the kind of remote device used to control a toy car, US investigators told a House of Representatives panel on Wednesday.

"It was a remote control for toy cars," US Representative Dutch Ruppersberger, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, told reporters after officials from the Department of Homeland Security, FBI and National Center for Counterterrorism briefed the committee.

"Which says to me, and brother number two has said, they got the information on how to build the bomb from Inspire magazine," Ruppersberger added.

Inspire was created by the American-Yemeni preacher Anwar al-Awlaki, a leader of al-Qaida's affiliate in Yemen who was killed in a US drone strike.

Ruppersberger said the article on bomb-building in Inspire was headlined: "How to build a bomb in your mom's kitchen."

Ruppersberger also confirmed that at least some of the explosives used in the attack had come from a fireworks shop in New Hampshire.

Related Content

Breaking news
August 22, 2018
Senior cleric says Iran will target Israel, allies if U.S. attacks

By REUTERS