British government unveils app discouraging female genital mutilation

By REUTERS
July 7, 2015 08:08

 
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A new app designed to educate young people about female genital mutilation (FGM) was launched in Britain on Tuesday amid a government crackdown on people who take girls abroad to undergo the practice during the summer holidays.

Britain's first FGM app, "Petals", presents facts and information about the practice, offers a quiz to test the user's knowledge and provides details on where young girls can receive help - including a direct link to an FGM advice line.

FGM involves the partial or total removal of external genitalia and can cause serious physical and psychological problems and complications in childbirth.

Some girls are at risk of being subjected to FGM, which is often seen as a gateway to marriage and a way of preserving a girl's purity, when their parents take them abroad during school holidays to visit extended family, British security forces say.

"Everyone has the right to live their life free from the fear of violence and abuse, and without experiencing the lasting trauma of female genital mutilation," Nicky Morgan, Britain's minister for women and equalities, said.

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