Egypt's Christian minority in somber mood for Easter holiday

By REUTERS
April 15, 2017 13:07
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ALEXANDRIA, Egypt - Members of Egypt's Christian minority flocked to church on Friday but two church bomb attacks on Palm Sunday that killed 45 people have left many in a somber mood over Easter.

Worshippers from the nearly 2,000-year-old Coptic Christian community attended church services, but the holiday to mark the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ was being observed in subdued fashion, according to church officials.

In the city of Alexandria, Christians congregated at Saint Mark's Cathedral, historic seat of the Coptic Pope, to attend Good Friday prayers. Worshippers passed through a metal detector at the building entrance, where one of the bombs went off.

Rafiq Bishry, head of the church's organizational committee, said he was surprised that so many people had come.

"We expected that people would be too scared to attend prayers but there was no need for our expectations because there are a lot of people here," he told Reuters Television.

"This is a clear message to the whole world that we are not afraid," he said.

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