Mexico's Calderon makes new push for reform of labor laws

By REUTERS
September 2, 2012 05:27

 
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MEXICO CITY - Mexican President Felipe Calderon sent a new proposal to liberalize the country's antiquated labor laws to lawmakers on Saturday as he seeks to fast-track the legislation before leaving office at the end of November.

Calderon's draft bill, submitted at the start of the new Congress by Interior Minister Alejandro Poire, is aimed at helping spur stronger growth in Latin America's second biggest economy.

Incoming President Enrique Pena Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, has also pledged to back labor reform, and may work to help Calderon as the PRI will need opposition support to get its own laws through Congress.

Agreeing on labor reform has long proved difficult in Mexico, and the proposal could be a litmus test of how the PRI and Calderon's conservative National Action Party, or PAN, cooperate in the new Congress, which lasts three years.

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