Report: some states in Syrian war fail to help victims

By REUTERS
February 1, 2016 02:31
1 minute read.

 
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BEIRUT- A report by international charity Oxfam on Monday showed some of the countries most deeply involved in Syria's civil war, including Russia, Saudi Arabia and France, are among the least generous in helping its victims.

Oxfam released the report ahead of a donor conference in London on Thursday along with an appeal for increased aid and resettlement abroad for 10 percent of the refugees registered in Syria's neighbors by the end of the year.

Most rich countries were contributing less than their "fair share" of financial aid, the amount a country should contribute relative to the size of its economy. Countries gave 56.5 percent of the $8.9 billion requested by aid appeals for 2015, it said.

"As a bare minimum the international community needs to fund the aid appeals (for refugees)," Oxfam's Daniel Gorevan said via telephone. The conflict has created more than 4 million refugees and displaced another nearly 7 million inside Syria.

Gorevan said there had been a "significant drop off in Gulf funding" for Syria aid and the overall lack of funds was exacerbating the crisis.

"The impact of the aid cuts has been quite devastating, with food rations cut, and less access to services like health and education. A smaller number of refugees are receiving less assistance," he said.

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