Tribal violence in South Sudan kills 47

By REUTERS
January 17, 2012 19:26

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

JUBA - Around 47 people have been killed in tribal violence in South Sudan, the latest in a cycle of attacks that have displaced some 60,000 people in the new African nation, officials said on Tuesday.

South Sudan became independent in July under a 2005 peace agreement with Khartoum to end decades of civil war. But the government has been struggling to end tribal and rebel violence killing at least 3,000 last year.

The violence broke out in the vast Jonglei state in December, when the Lou Nuer attacked settlements of the rival Murle tribe. Local officials have said as many as 2,000 people may have died, although UN officials say the toll is likely to be much lower.

Philip Thon Leek Deng, a local leader and member of parliament, said a youth militia from the Murle tribe attacked Duk Padyet in Jonglei late on Monday, mostly killing young children, women and old people from the Lou Nuer tribe.

"They did not take cattle. They were only coming for annihilation," Deng told reporters in Juba.

Related Content

Breaking news
August 14, 2018
Italy motorway bridge collapses over Genoa, 'dozens' feared dead

By REUTERS