Mama Of' working to restore supplies

Tnuva's Mama Of' poultry producer said Sunday that supplies of its product to consumer outlets would be back to normal "shortly," acknowledging shortages caused by the war.

By DANIEL KENNEMER
August 22, 2006 06:37
1 minute read.

 
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Tnuva's Mama Of' poultry producer said Sunday that supplies of its product to consumer outlets would be back to normal "shortly," acknowledging shortages caused by the war. Located in rocket-riddled Kiryat Shmona, Mama Of' experienced difficulties in maintaining production while "in the [bomb] shelters" and had to concentrate on frozen products and meeting obligations related to contracts and tenders with large clients, including the IDF, the company's spokeswoman said. This led to a shortage in refrigerated goods and other products on the wider market. "Within a short period, we will come out of this, and shortly there will be no more shortage in any part of the country," she assured. Supplies of other Tnuva products were not affected by the conflict, she said. Meanwhile, Israel's leading supermarket chains insisted Sunday that products from the North continued to be available as usual. Blue Square said there was "no problem whatsoever" in supplies of food products from the North, adding that during the fighting the company sent trucks to the region to ensure that goods would be transported to the center of the country. Supersol also said there were no shortages in its branches, and that any "temporary shortages from specific companies," were filled with products from other suppliers of similar goods.

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