Tomb of Jesus reopens in Jerusalem after restoration

Restoration works were completed at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, where according to Christian belief Jesus's body was buried.

By REUTERS
March 20, 2017 16:16

The tomb of Jesus at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem , Israel reopens after restoration on March 20, 2017 (credit: REUTERS)

The tomb of Jesus at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem , Israel reopens after restoration on March 20, 2017 (credit: REUTERS)

 
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The newly restored site said to be the tomb of Jesus Christ at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem was presented to media on Monday, after several months of restoration works.

The work focused on the Edicule, the ancient structure which according to Christian belief is located above the spot where Jesus's body was buried.

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The project's chief scientific supervisor, professor Antonia Moropoulou from the National Technical University of Athens, said the structure needed reinforcement and conservation.

The last restoration work at the site took place more than 200 years ago after a fire, media reports said, adding that disagreements between the Greek Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Armenian churches who share responsibility for the site have delayed conservation works until last year, when the church was labelled as unsafe by Israeli authorities.

Each denomination has contributed funds for the $3.3m (£2.3m) to the project. In addition, King Abdullah of Jordan has made a personal donation, media reports said.
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